Society for effecting the abolition of the slave trade
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Society for effecting the abolition of the slave trade [report].

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Published by Printed by Phillips & Fardon in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Microfilm. London, England : World Microfilms, 1978. On 1 microfilm reel with other titles ; 35 mm. (Anti-slavery collection, 18th-19th centuries ; reel 14, v. H, no. 174).

SeriesAnti-slavery collection, 18th-19th centuries ;, reel 14, v. H, no. 174.
ContributionsSociety for the Abolition of the Slave Trade.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 82/534 (H)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination3 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2975995M
LC Control Number84224383

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Extract. Society for the Purpose of Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade (act. –), formally constituted on 22 May , was composed of predominantly middle-class idealists, some of them radical in their opinions, whose purpose was to campaign specifically for the abolition of the British slave trade. It drew upon earlier abolitionist sentiment in. On May 22nd, , twelve men met at 2 George Yard in the City of London, in what was then a printing shop and bookstore, to set up the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade (or The Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade). Nine of the twelve founders were Quakers: John Barton, William Dillwyn, George Harrison, Samuel Hoare Jr., Joseph Hooper, John Lloyd, Joseph Woods Sr., . Early abolitionist activity in Britain was channeled through the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade (SEAST), organized in May , which, with some justification, has been described as the prototype of the nineteenth-century reform organization. Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade In Granville Sharp and his friend Thomas Clarkson decided to form the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. Although Sharp and Clarkson were both Anglicans, nine out of the twelve members on the committee, were Quakers.

member of the influential London Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade. The Society had been founded in by two Anglican campaigners, Granville Sharp and Thomas Clarkson. But many other members, including Dickson, were Quakers. British Quakers File Size: 2MB. Printed by Ds. Willison for the Society Instituted at Edinburgh for the Purpose of Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade Edinburgh Extracts from the evidence delivered before a Select Committee of the House of Commons, in the years and ( Mb PDF). Abolition of the Slave Trade. A strong movement emerged in 18th-century Britain to put an end to the buying and selling of human beings. This campaign to abolish the slave trade developed alongside international events such as the French Revolution, as well as retaliation by maroon communities, sporadic unrest, and individual acts of resistance from enslaved people in the British colonies. This source discusses Hannah More’s role in the abolition of slavery and the slave trade. This is an aspect of More’s life that sometimes may be overlooked in biographical information. More was a member of the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the African Slave Trade. She lived in a town where the slave trade was prominent.

Sudoc Catalogue:: Livre / BookLetter to the treasurer of the Society Instituted for the Purpose of Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade [Ressource électronique] / from the . The 'Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade' organised a nationwide effort to highlight the evils of the Atlantic slave trade and to mark it as an issue of national outcry. It met. Last week, aro people downloaded books from my site - 8 people gave books can take me from 2 to 10 hours to create. I want to keep them free, but need some support to be able to do so. If you can, please make a small donation (the average is £).Author: Thomas Clarkson. In July, , members of the Society for the Abolition of Slave Trade established the African Institution, an organization that was committed to watch over the execution of the law, seek a ban on the slave trade by foreign powers and to promote the "civilization and happiness" of Africa.